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If we thought 2016 was hard, 2017 could be even tougher. It will be a year of big political decisions for Britain, so there must be no more fudging from Theresa May - she needs to come up with a plan for Brexit, and do so ahead of her March 31 deadline for triggering article 50. Meanwhile out neighbours will have other things beyond Brexit on their minds...

The Prime Minster must prove she can stand up to the hard Brexiteers

If we thought 2016 was hard, 2017 could be even tougher. It will be a year of big political decisions for Britain, so there must be no more fudging from... Read more

Chinese for Labour won an Award for their dedicated work in combatting the rise in hate crime after the Brexit vote.

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The Award was presented by Rt Hon Baroness Angela Smith PC, Labour Leader in the House of Lords at last night's SME for Labour Annual Banquet.

** STOP PRESS ** Chinese for Labour Wins Award

Chinese for Labour won an Award for their dedicated work in combatting the rise in hate crime after the Brexit vote. The Award was presented by Rt Hon Baroness Angela... Read more

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Gala Chinese New Year Banquet 2017 on Wednesday, 8th February 2017 to celebrate the Year of the Rooster

We would be pleased if you would join us to celebrate the Year of the Rooster at our Gala Chinese New Year Banquet 2017 on Wednesday, 8th February 2017.

Chinese New Year 2017 Banquet

Gala Chinese New Year Banquet 2017 on Wednesday, 8th February 2017 to celebrate the Year of the Rooster We would be pleased if you would join us to celebrate the... Read more

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Notice of the Annual General Meeting of Chinese for Labour

This is notice that the Annual General Meeting of the members of Chinese for Labour will be held on Friday, 28th October 2016 at 18:30 at Civil Service College, 25 Queen Anne's Gate, St James's Park, London SW1H 9BU.Chair 

 

Chinese for Labour 2016 AGM

Notice of the Annual General Meeting of Chinese for Labour This is notice that the Annual General Meeting of the members of Chinese for Labour will be held on Friday,... Read more

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As a proud British citizen, born in Malaysia and of Chinese descent, 2016 has been a terrifying year. The rise in racist incidents and attacks since the EU Referendum has been well-documented – an outpouring of hate that shocked so many across the country, who believed us to be an open, diverse and welcoming society. I’ve received so many emails from friends in the Chinese community and with ancestors across the world who have experienced abuse in the last six weeks, it makes you wonder what it means to be British.

A Union of Citizens

  As a proud British citizen, born in Malaysia and of Chinese descent, 2016 has been a terrifying year. The rise in racist incidents and attacks since the EU Referendum... Read more

I was sat across from four Americans on Shanghai’s Bund waterfront when China was beat into second place at the last Olympics.

Along with hundreds of locals we crowded around a giant outdoor screen to witness the moment. Slow motion shots of American gymnast Gabby Douglas vaulting through the air offered visual confirmation of her and her country’s victory.

The gathered expats dotted around the restaurant’s patio expelled a small breath of relief, celebrating respite from the national sense of hubris accompanying what seemed like China’s unassailable journey at the Games.

For us Douglas’ routine represented a melodious art form, the human body conquering its physical realm. For them it represented a missed opportunity for China to project its strength through sporting triumph.

China doesn’t usually do soft power well. During President Xi Jin Ping’s UK visit full page print adverts were taken out by the country’s information ministry to broadcast the leader’s presence. The country’s prowess at Olympic sports is one of the few tools in the box it can, and has successfully, wielded.

For so conflated with a sense of place in the world are the Olympics for China, that the fragile reaction to the prospect of it coming third at this year’s Games is little surprise.

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Xinhua news agency, the ruling Communist party’s mouthpiece, tweeted pictures of a splayed and dejected gymnast You Hao to its 5 million followers, accompanied by a choice word: “flop”.

Guilt is not a concept as societally familiar to our Chinese cousins as it is to those of us in Western cultures. Shame, however, is a spike felt even more sharply, particularly given its very public dimension.

You Hao has, inadvertently and unwillingly, become the poster boy for the impending national sense of shame should China not resume its ‘rightful’ position in second, or indeed first place.

The historical significance of the offending nation being Britain is not lost on the arbiters of state control.

“The country which has never finished above China is about to,” complained Xinhua. This is in spite of China sending its largest ever Olympic team to Rio.

This small nation of quaintness, a forlorn power beating a machine which seizes its athletes at the youngest of ages, moulds and rote trains them to be both medal winning engines and devices of state propaganda will dent the delicate Chinese psyche.

A brief stint as an English teacher in Beijing during the last Olympics quickly taught me the sense of victimhood which still lingered following the ‘hundred years of humiliation’. A century of intervention by Western powers, notably the British, had prevented China from assuming its rightful place as a world power. So the textbooks read.

Remedying this tragedy has been a hallmark of President Xi’s Chinese Dream — an attempt to galvanise the populace behind a vision of a powerful, uncompromising nation. Bonnie Glaser of the Centre for Strategic and International Studies, a US based think-tank, articulates this vision succinctly: “China will be at the centre, and every other nation will have to consider China’s interests.”

Third place is not one which China sees itself having in the world. But maybe this loss, and it will be perceived as a loss, will force China to re-examine its fragile national ego. Perhaps it will teach the nation that strength can sometimes be best demonstrated in dealing with defeat. And humility in victory is a trait to which we all aspire.

For if President Xi is to have his Chinese Dream, a China with these qualities will be an easier one to live with.

What China can learn from its Olympic 'flop'

I was sat across from four Americans on Shanghai’s Bund waterfront when China was beat into second place at the last Olympics. Along with hundreds of locals we crowded around...

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Re-building trust in the economy is essential to a successful post-Brexit future

by Sonny Leong CBE, Co-Founder SME for Labour and Chair, Chinese for Labour and Tom Watson MP, Deputy Leader of the Labour Party

There is no doubt that the 23rd June 2016 was a watershed moment for our country. But what type of watershed will it be? Will Brexit signal the decline of the UK as a global power, a potential break-up of the Union and a voluntary resignation from the world stage with a shrinking economy and a divided population?

Or will it force us to confront some stark realities and bridge some of the deep fissures in our society and in our economy? Can we use Brexit as an opportunity to think afresh about how to create a more united society, a more just economy and forge a new role in the world?

Re-building trust in the economy

Re-building trust in the economy is essential to a successful post-Brexit future by Sonny Leong CBE, Co-Founder SME for Labour and Chair, Chinese for Labour and Tom Watson MP, Deputy... Read more

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Post EU-Referencum, reports of racially motivated attacks and abuse have increased exponentially. An anti-EU campaign that relied heavily on anti-immigration rhetoric has allowed racist language and racism to become normalised. 

In a bid to fight against the rise of xenophobia, Campaign Bootcamp has launched an emergency scholarship for those who want to fight back against racism and/or xenophobia. The scholarships are for up to seven people to come to the last Campaign Bootcamp of 2016. The scholarship covers the full course fee (including accommodation and food).

All applications must be received by 09:00 on Wednesday the 10th of August. To apply people need to apply at the website here: http://www.campaignbootcamp.org/apply

As well as this new scholarship, Campaign Bootcamp has funding for activists of colour (working on any campaign issue), environmental activists, mental health activists, international development activists, refugees and migrants and much more. All the information needed to apply is on the website here:http://www.campaignbootcamp.org/apply

Campaign Bootcamp: Standing up to racism and xenophobia scholarship

Post EU-Referencum, reports of racially motivated attacks and abuse have increased exponentially. An anti-EU campaign that relied heavily on anti-immigration rhetoric has allowed racist language and racism to become normalised. ...

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Our deepest condolences to the family and friends of Jo Cox. A beacon of a person who was compassionate, and fought tirelessly for social justice and fairness.

RIP Jo Cox

Our deepest condolences to the family and friends of Jo Cox. A beacon of a person who was compassionate, and fought tirelessly for social justice and fairness. Read more

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On Wednesday 24th February 2016, Chinese for Labour celebrated Chinese New Year with their annual banquet at the Phoenix Palace. Over 200 people attended the event including British Chinese guests from business, the arts, students, public services and charities. Many members of Labour's Shadow Cabinet and fellow MPs and peers were also represented.

Sonny Leong, Chairman of Chinese for Labour, praised the diversity of Britain and emphasised the vital need for the Labour Party to continue reaching out to ethnic minority communities. Sonny also gave special thanks to Raymond Siu, owner of the Phoenix Palace for hosting the event. 

Other speakers at the event include Jeremy Corbyn, Leader of the Labour Party; Tom Watson, Deputy leader of the Labour Party, and Hilary Benn, Shadow Foreign Secretary.   

Jeremy Corbyn thanked Chinese for Labour for its support and contribution to the Labour Party. He welcomed the British Chinese community's contribution to British society, called for more Chinese to be taught in our schools and for the Government to stop its negative attitude to international students.

Hilary Benn spoke of the need for Britain to remain part of Europe especially in an increasingly globalised world. EU membership gives the British people jobs, investment and growth, and leaving the EU brings great uncertainty and risk.

Highlights of the event include a Lion dance and auction, the proceeds of which will help support British Chinese people into politics. 

Chinese for Labour wish everyone who attended the event a prosperous Year of the Monkey and best wishes for the future. 

 

Chinese for Labour New Year Banquet 2016

On Wednesday 24th February 2016, Chinese for Labour celebrated Chinese New Year with their annual banquet at the Phoenix Palace. Over 200 people attended the event including British Chinese guests...

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